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20121225
20121225
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, one that isn't based on a weapon. also, in the south i remember reading during the civil rights period where they were hosing people down with water and the water also had a lethal impact. so i am just saying that these weapons sound, well we are not using a gun or actual bullets. but it does not actually necessarily, i am not convinced that it necessarily always takes away the lethal aspect. and i think that we have plenty of examples where people of color and low income working people have particularly been victimized by that and there was even that incident here at the theatre where that young man was brandishing another little, i don't know, he was not brandishing a gun was killed. so, i'm just afraid that if then, the option comes to you as a taser that that is where the people will go automatically. instead of having like you said, the slow down, think more. whatever. i'm not, you know, and since tasers do have a lethal, there is a possibility of that and i'm just not... i just wish that the conversation were really different here. >> i agree, i don't disagree with what you are s
's support of african american entrepreneurship, civil rights and political involvement began before 1958 when he took ownership of the bar and remained constant until his death in 2003. his influence extended far beyond the neighborhood to include the larger sphere of san francisco. in 1963, jordan became the first african american to campaign for mayor of san francisco, running on a progressive platform of social justice and racial equality. the bar was a centerpiece of jordan's neighborhood community building activities and he reviedd in the upstairs unit for nearly 50 years. jordan was known locally as the mayor of butcher town, which was the historic name for the area immediately surrounding the bar. his efforts to establish a place of community and legacy within the bayview area continues for which he is known to this day. the bar continues to be operated by the jordan family, who are here today, who support the land mark designation. this concludes my presentation, if you have any questions. >> thank you. supervisor cohen? >> i think that's it. >> let's open this up for publi
of that population being impacted. and the aclu is also concerned with the civil rights implications that the supervisors spoke of today. you know, across the nation and in san francisco, you will see the african american communities of color are impacted by accessive use of force that would lead us to believe that once they are instituted they would also be disproportionately used against the xhupts of color. because they are easy to use it will increase over use and officers will be use it as the first line rather than reverting to what they used in training such as verbal commands and we also have outlined many incidents of litigation that have occurred... >> just some follow up questions. did you ever get a response from the mayor on your letter? >> no, we did not. >> and any of the staff in >> no. >> i think that the letter was actually really well done and it is well documented and there are a number of citations in here, do you recall what i read to commander ali, right now, referencing how it looks to be when tasers are involved in working with people who have mental health i
on the same but we put them on it and you're probably in the next genraition of those radios right now and by the way -- there was a man here who preceded the mayor. it was then called the chief administrative officer and rudy rothenberg and incredible civil servant and i worked with him on this building. in fact i drew this building. i had architecture work as a midship man and if i find it i'm going to give it to you. we also as a result of that we subsumed the departm
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4